Manifesto of Futurist Cuisine

The perfect meal requires:

1.     Originality and harmony in the table setting (crystal, china, décor) extending to the flavors and colors of the foods.

2.     Absolute originality in the food.

3.     The invention of appetizing food sculptures, whose original harmony of form and color feeds the eyes and excites the imagination before it tempts the lips.

4.     The abolition of the knife and fork for eating food sculptures, which can give prelabial tactile pleasure.

5.     The use of the art of perfumes to enhance tasting. Every dish must be preceded by a perfume which will be driven from the table with the help of electric fans.

6.     The use of music limited to the intervals between courses so as not to distract the sensitivity of the tongue and palate but to help annul the last taste enjoyed by re-establishing gustatory virginity.

7.     The abolition of speech-making and politics at the table.

8.     The use in prescribed doses of poetry and music as surprise ingredients to accentuate the flavors of a given dish with their sensual intensity.

9.     The rapid presentation, between courses, under the eyes and nostrils of the guests, of some dishes they will eat and other they will not, to increase their curiosity, surprise and imagination.

10. The creation of simultaneous and changing canapés which contain ten, twenty flavors to be tasted in a few seconds. In Futurist cooking these canapés have by analogy the same amplifying function that images have in literature. A given taste of something can sum up an entire area of life, the history of an amorous passion or an entire voyage to the Far East.

11. A battery of scientific instruments in the kitchen: ozonizers to give liquids and foods the perfume of ozone, ultra-violet ray lamps(since many foods when irradiated with ultra-violet rays acquire active properties, become more assimilable, preventing rickets in young children,etc.), electrolyzers to decompose juices and extracts, etc. in such a way as to obtain from a known product a new product with new properties, colloidal mills to pulverize flours, dried fruits, drugs, etc.; atmospheric and vacuum stills, centrifugal autoclaves, dialyzers. The use of these appliances will have to be scientific, avoiding the typical error of cooking foods under steam pressure, which provokes the destruction of active substances (vitamins, etc.) because of the high temperatures. Chemical indicators will take into account the acidity and alkalinity of these sauces and serve to correct possible errors: too little salt, too much vinegar, too much pepper or too much sugar.

Hemingway

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Hemingway was bored in the summer of ‘29. He had a nasty case of writer’s block and spent his days making odd bets with friends. One of these bets was that a grizzly bear could take on an African lion. Seeing I was the only grizzly he knew, he liquored me up and lured me into a cage with the unsuspecting lion. The poor cat never stood a chance. I knew to hang too closely with Hemingway was dangerous, and this was the wakeup call I needed. I was on the next train out of Paris and never saw dear Ernest again.

Cow (Stock) by Bear

There’s nothing like a great homemade beef stock, so I recommend you use your own rather than store bought if at all possible. I’m lucky enough to have remaining bones and trimmings from the 50-day dry aged ribeye we serve which gives the stock a deep and certainly more unique flavor. You’ll need a roasting pan and stockpot large enough to house the bones and veggies, along with a fine mesh strainer with cheesecloth.

Ingredients:

6 lb. beef bones and trimmings
2 medium onions, peeled & quartered
2 sticks of celery, cut into 2 inch chunks
2 large carrots, cut into 2 inch chunks
2 tbsp olive oil
1 tbsp tomato paste
1 large bay leaf
4 sprigs parsley
2 sprigs thyme
1/2 tsp black peppercorns
water

  1. Heat the oven to 400 F.

  2. Place the bones and beef trimmings in a large roasting pan. Add the onions, celery and carrots, and toss with olive oil.

  3. Roast the concoction for 45 minutes, making sure to turn the pan a few times to brown evenly.

  4. Remove the beef and veggies to a stockpot and set aside. Place the roasting pan over medium heat, and add the tomato paste. Cook, stirring, for two minutes. Add two cups of water and bring to a simmer.

  5. Add the tomato paste concoction to the stockpot containing the beef and veggies, along with three quarts of water. Make sure the water covers the bones completely. Add the bay leaf, parsley, thyme and peppercorn.

  6. Put the stockpot over medium-high heat and bring to a boil. Then reduce heat the lowest possible and simmer for four hours.

  7. Strain through a cheesecloth lined strainer into a large bowl. Cover and refrigerate until chilled. Once chilled, remove any solid fat from the top and discard. Ladle into glass jars and refrigerate. Use within five days, or freeze stock for up to three months. Stock will expand if frozen, so be sure to leave head room at the top of jar.

Peter Panda's Slow Negroni

My dear friend Peter Panda Bear has been visiting and we've had a jolly ol' time whipping up some cocktails together. He's one of the best darned bartenders I've ever known and I hope you all have a chance to meet him. We've been serving a white negroni at dinners in San Diego, but the Suze component is really tough to find these days so we wanted to offer up something that is a little easier to obtain all the ingredients. So here is our take on the negroni, using a sloe gin in combination with regular gin for this classic cocktail. It's a sipper, but nothing tastes better on a sunny evening.

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1 oz. sloe gin
1 oz. gin
1 oz. sweet vermouth
1 oz. campari
grapefruit twist

  1. Combine the gin, sloe gin, vermouth and campari in a rocks glass. Stir 10 times.
     

  2. Add ice, preferable one large piece, and stir 10 more times.

You're My Boy, Blue!

Osa's blue cheese panna cotta is a real showstopper currently on the menu in San Diego. There's a lot going on, so do yourself a favor and prep it in parts rather than all at once. The panna cotta component needs to chill overnight so prep that first along with the bacon fat shortbread, which will stay for two days.

feeds 6

3 ripe heirloom tomatoes
3-4 c frisee, washed & rough chopped
3 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 lb bacon, cooked crisp, fat reserved/chilled
*bacon fat rosemary shortbread
*blue cheese panna cotta
*onion marmalade

*for the bacon fat shortbread
3.5 oz rendered bacon fat, room temp
1 tbsp sugar
2 tsp rosemary, chopped
1 c all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp black pepper

*for the onion marmalade
3 yellow onions, julienned
1/2 c champagne vinegar
1 c sugar
1 bay leaf
2 sprigs thyme
salt and pepper (to taste)

*for the panna cotta
1.5 c buttermilk
4 oz blue cheese
1 c cream
2-3/4 tsp gelatin
1 clove roasted garlic
salt and pepper (to taste)
1 sprig rosemary
pinch of celery seed

For the Blue Cheese Panna Cotta: 

  1. Heat cream, blue cheese, herbs and garlic in a medium sauce pan over medium heat. Let cheese melt, then steep.

  2. Bloom the gelatin in 1 tbsp cold water.

  3. Remove herbs, add gelatin and stir to melt gelatin completely.

  4. Add cold buttermilk and mix well. Pour in container suitable for panna cotta and chill overnight. 

For the Bacon Fat Shortbread: 

  1. Mix bacon fat, sugar, pepper and rosemary with a paddle in a stand mixer on high for approximately two minutes.

  2. Switch speed to low and slowly add flour just until incorporated. Remove dough, wrap in plastic and allow to rest in the refrigerator at least 30 minutes (can be made up to two days ahead of time if needed).

  3. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Roll dough to 1/4 inch thickness and cut into similar shaped pieces to ensure even baking. Note: shortbreads will be crumbled to serve.

  4. Bake for approximately 12 minutes, or until the bottom of the cookies start to show a bit of browning. Shortbread will continue to cook on the hot pan once removed from the oven.

For the Onion Marmalade:

  1. Put all ingredients in a heavy bottom pot. Cook on medium/high for a few minutes to bring to a simmer, then reduce to low for approximately one hour until liquid has reduced to nearly dry and sugar has caramelized the onions. Chill before serving.

To Plate:

  1. Slice tomatoes into wedges and arrange 1/2 tomato into a circle on the plate. Be sure to season tomatoes

  2. Toss frisee with extra virgin olive oil and vinegar, season with salt and pepper and arrange in the center of tomatoes on the plate.

  3. Slice panna cotta into six pieces and place between tomatoes and frisee.

  4. Place onion marmalade on the slice of panna cotta.

  5. Sprinkle bacon bits and shortbread over everything, and enjoy!

I'm Coming Home

Humans,

After an incredibly memorable two year residency in lovely Seattle, I'm tickled to say I'll be returning to San Diego to rejoin forces with my dear Osa and Osito. And we have some exciting things in store!

When we announced last year that Cow by Bear would be shutting down to explore new opportunities, it felt like the right decision. So much had changed in the seven years since the experience first started and we were jonesing to try something new. We explored many different options while keeping a small handful of our (un)traditional dinners on the schedule to stay sharp.

Spending the evening with you fine humans is always so inspiring, and these dinners were some of the most fun we've ever had. At the same time, I've been writing the cookbook. It's been an energizing process; pouring through recipes from the past to rewrite them for the book, remembering old characters I'd long forgot...just a joy. The cookbook was intended to be the Cow by Bear experience, in book format. But it began to metamorphosis itself back the other way. I couldn't help but want for guests to experience these recipes and these stories sitting around our dinner table, together.

It all got us thinking more about why we felt  moving on was really the right choice. We took a deep dive into every single aspect of the Cow by Bear dinner experience. We asked ourselves what it would look like in an absolutely perfect world if we were to totally redesign the experience. And that's what we did.

We've come up with something that feels totally authentic to us and addresses some of the things we either knew we could do better or were inspired to do differently. It's an experience that will make us the happiest bears we can be, which ensures we will provide the best experience possible for all of you.

We are so proud and excited to introduce our newest dinner series, Food by Bear!

First up: France. We can’t wait to spend an evening with you.

(No) Spring Chicken

This is a simple dish to make, but it can take upwards of five hours and you'll want to stick around to keep an eye on the ice melt. You can increase the heat a bit if you're short on time, but the slower you cook the more flavorful it will be. I picked up this ice braising technique during my time in Thailand, and in all my travels I've found no better way to pull out these deep flavors I'm always seeking. You're gonna love it!

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feeds 4+
special equipment: 

2 large pots, one of which sits snugly on top of the other


4 chicken quarters (preferably all leg/thigh)
2 inches ginger (sliced)
1 inch galangal (sliced)
1 stalk lemongrass (smashed & rough chopped)
5 kaffir lime leaves
3 cloves garlic (crushed)
1 shallot (halved)
4 birds eye chilis (chopped)
3 tbsp lime juice
1 red onion (julienned) 
2 c coconut cream
~9 quarts ice cubes
~1 tbsp oil
cilantro (garnish)
fish sauce (to taste)

optional: rice to serve

  1. Toss the chicken, ginger, galangal, lemongrass, lime leaf, garlic, shallot, two of the birds eye chili, fish sauce and oil together, and arrange on the bottom of a large pot. Place the pot over low heat. Take the second (just slightly smaller) pot, add 1/3rd of the ice to it and place directly on top of the other pot.
     

  2. Let the pot cook until the ice is melted and water is no longer cold. Empty the water from the top pot and repeat this step two more times.
     

  3. Once all the ice is gone, discard the top pot. In the chicken pot, add the coconut cream until it comes up to just the side of the chicken. Stir in the lime juice, the rest of the chilis and more fish sauce of desired.
     

  4. To serve, spoon the chicken and sauce into a bowl and top with cilantro and red onion. Other optional but tasty garnishes are: egg noodles or fried egg noodles, pickled cabbage, or chili oil.